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Why 'but why?' is a good question

But why? Anyone raising or working with small children may well hear that question and cringe at the flashback to the last 100 times they've heard that question in the last hour. Kate Pecher points out that maybe this question is not so bad after all. 

The world is constantly throwing us into uncertainty. What on earth is going on with Brexit? Why do people think it’s acceptable not to use their car indicators? Will the final series of Game of Thrones be as good as we hope?

It’s not just adults who ask life’s big questions. My 3-year-old has just entered the ‘why’ phase of her life. Here are some examples of her mind blowing quandaries along with my (sometimes dubious) answers.

Q: Why is it windy?
A: Erm I don’t know really, it just is I guess. (Luckily my husband stepped in at this point and started talking about air pressure.)

 

Q: Why do we have eyelids?
A: Easy, so we can close them and go to sleep. They also help with protecting your eyes from dust and dryness and things, but mainly, it's the sleep.

Q: Why am I shouting?
A: Honestly, if you don’t know that then what hope do I have?

Q: Why am I called Elsa?
A: You’re not, you’re called Miriam. You just introduce yourself as Elsa to everyone you meet. Apparently you would rather live alone in a freezing castle with only a snowman for a friend than with us. On a side note, if you could stop doing that it would be great. It’s getting old.

Q: Why are we watching The Little Mermaid?
A: Because you have asked me at least 40 times since this morning if we could watch The Little Mermaid whilst wearing your mermaid costume and brushing your hair with a fork and I’ve finally caved. Plus I wanted 90 minutes peace and it seemed the easiest way to achieve it.

Q: Why are you doing the washing?
A: Because I have two children. I am constantly doing washing. Just call it my favourite pastime (not).

Q: Why don’t I like carrots?
A: You do like carrots don’t you? Please say you do. You liked them yesterday and so I’ve planned the whole meal around that. Please like carrots.

Q: Why is Baby Anna eating that thing off the floor?
A: (shouted from a different room in the house) What? What is she eating? Can you stop her please? Don’t just put your finger in her mouth though…Never mind. I’m coming.

So maybe I don’t always give the best answers but I hope my girl carries on asking questions. Because if kids are encouraged to question the little things now maybe they will go on to ask the world-changing questions later.

Kate Pecher is a part-time midwife and full-time mum.